Emirates Leaks

Emirates plans to rely on militias after withdrawing its troops from Yemen

The United Arab Emirates began relying on armed militias in Yemen after withdrawing troops from the country, which has been waging a criminal war for several years.

Hundreds of recruits from the Transitional Council were transferred for training outside.

The United Arab Emirates began relying on armed militias in Yemen after withdrawing troops from the country, which has been waging a criminal war for several years.

Hundreds of recruits from the Transitional Council were transferred for training outside Yemen.

The recruits were transported from Yemen via the sea and flights from Aden, without disclosing who had been transferred to the conscripts who would undergo military training.

Reuters quoted a senior UAE official saying they were not worried about a military vacuum in Yemen, in the time Abu Dhabi’s recruited about 90,000 Yemeni troops.

The Yemeni political researcher Abdul Baki Shamsan said that the UAE’s transfer of hundreds of recruits for training is part of its strategy of media exit, not military, from Yemen. Some sectors of the UAE military were transferred but the funding of forces affiliated to it remains in a complete absence of the legitimate authority.

He added that the UAE has managed through these militias and its affiliates to tighten control of southern Yemen and that the benefit of its announcement of withdrawal from is easing international pressure without losing the advantages of presence, control, and influence exercised by its groups and militias.

On the other hand, the Yemeni writer, Nabil Bakiri, said that Abu Dhabi has already trained thousands of individuals, and what is happening now may be a new polarization of hundreds of elements that were previously working within the national army, and was merged and polarized as a result of the imbalance at the level of state and the interruption and weak salaries.

In parallel, a report by the Guardian newspaper said that the UAE will hand over its positions in Yemen to foreign mercenaries and local militias loyal to the UAE and not subject to the legitimate authority of the Yemeni government.

The newspaper said that the withdrawal marks an important moment in the four-year civil war.

The Guardian quoted the UAE’s claims that its remaining forces in Yemen would focus on counterterrorism efforts against the Isis and al-Qaeda rather than the Huthis.

The report revealed that the UAE would continue to support the separatist movement in Yemen, while many analysts warned that the current stalemate in Yemen could backfire.

The newspaper said that the withdrawal of the UAE “weaken the Saudi military capabilities in Yemen, which increases the pressure on Riyadh to continue the political solution instead of the military war,” noting that while it may be said that the withdrawal of the UAE from Yemen, even in part may be a recognition of defeat, but UAE officials insist that the redeployment was a deliberate step that reflects the UN’s diplomatic progress in Hodeidah.

A senior UAE official told AFP that his country is withdrawing troops from there as part of a “redeployment” plan for “strategic and tactical” reasons.

The agency was quoted as saying in Dubai that the UAE was moving from a “military strategy” to a “peace first” plan.

Later, the New York Times reported that the UAE was withdrawing its troops from Yemen at a rapid pace after it realized that the crushing war that turned the country into a humanitarian disaster can not be won.

The newspaper quoted Western diplomats familiar with the details as saying that a reduction in the number of UAE troops had already occurred, driven by the desire to get out of war too expensive even if angered by their Saudi allies.

She stressed that Emiratis avoided announcing the withdrawal step publicly to ease the discomfort of their Saudi counterparts. However, Western diplomats noted that the Saudis were very disappointed by the UAE decision and that senior officials in the Royal Court tried to discourage UAE officials from the withdrawal step.

A few days ago reliable sources revealed the details and circumstances of the UAE withdrawal scenario in Yemen and that a European country played a key role in decision-making and implementation.

The sources pointed out that a European country wants to go on huge deals to sell weapons to the UAE but it is under intense internal pressure, forcing it to influence the UAE regime to decide to withdraw from Yemen.

According to the sources, this country has advised the UAE to withdraw its troops from Yemen, especially that the number of hundreds in exchange for keeping the dependence on foreign mercenaries and Abu Dhabi militias scattered in different parts of Yemen.

The sources confirmed that the plan of the UAE regime is to conduct a proxy war in Yemen through its militias and foreign mercenaries, allowing Abu Dhabi to manage operations from outside the picture and allow the continuation of military supplies and the removal of the UAE from the forefront.

The recruits were transported from Yemen via the sea and flights from Aden, without disclosing who had been transferred to the conscripts who would undergo military training.

Reuters quoted a senior UAE official saying they were not worried about a military vacuum in Yemen, in the time Abu Dhabi’s recruited about 90,000 Yemeni troops.

The Yemeni political researcher Abdul Baki Shamsan said that the UAE’s transfer of hundreds of recruits for training is part of its strategy of media exit, not military, from Yemen. Some sectors of the UAE military were transferred but the funding of forces affiliated to it remains in a complete absence of the legitimate authority.

He added that the UAE has managed through these militias and its affiliates to tighten control of southern Yemen and that the benefit of its announcement of withdrawal from is easing international pressure without losing the advantages of presence, control, and influence exercised by its groups and militias.

On the other hand, the Yemeni writer, Nabil Bakiri, said that Abu Dhabi has already trained thousands of individuals, and what is happening now may be a new polarization of hundreds of elements that were previously working within the national army, and was merged and polarized as a result of the imbalance at the level of state and the interruption and weak salaries.

In parallel, a report by the Guardian newspaper said that the UAE will hand over its positions in Yemen to foreign mercenaries and local militias loyal to the UAE and not subject to the legitimate authority of the Yemeni government.

The newspaper said that the withdrawal marks an important moment in the four-year civil war.

The Guardian quoted the UAE’s claims that its remaining forces in Yemen would focus on counterterrorism efforts against the Isis and al-Qaeda rather than the Huthis.

The report revealed that the UAE would continue to support the separatist movement in Yemen, while many analysts warned that the current stalemate in Yemen could backfire.

The newspaper said that the withdrawal of the UAE “weaken the Saudi military capabilities in Yemen, which increases the pressure on Riyadh to continue the political solution instead of the military war,” noting that while it may be said that the withdrawal of the UAE from Yemen, even in part may be a recognition of defeat, but UAE officials insist that the redeployment was a deliberate step that reflects the UN’s diplomatic progress in Hodeidah.

A senior UAE official told AFP that his country is withdrawing troops from there as part of a “redeployment” plan for “strategic and tactical” reasons.

The agency was quoted as saying in Dubai that the UAE was moving from a “military strategy” to a “peace first” plan.

Later, the New York Times reported that the UAE was withdrawing its troops from Yemen at a rapid pace after it realized that the crushing war that turned the country into a humanitarian disaster can not be won.

The newspaper quoted Western diplomats familiar with the details as saying that a reduction in the number of UAE troops had already occurred, driven by the desire to get out of war too expensive even if angered by their Saudi allies.

She stressed that Emiratis avoided announcing the withdrawal step publicly to ease the discomfort of their Saudi counterparts. However, Western diplomats noted that the Saudis were very disappointed by the UAE decision and that senior officials in the Royal Court tried to discourage UAE officials from the withdrawal step.

A few days ago reliable sources revealed the details and circumstances of the UAE withdrawal scenario in Yemen and that a European country played a key role in decision-making and implementation.

The sources pointed out that a European country wants to go on huge deals to sell weapons to the UAE but it is under intense internal pressure, forcing it to influence the UAE regime to decide to withdraw from Yemen.

According to the sources, this country has advised the UAE to withdraw its troops from Yemen, especially that the number of hundreds in exchange for keeping the dependence on foreign mercenaries and Abu Dhabi militias scattered in different parts of Yemen.

The sources confirmed that the plan of the UAE regime is to conduct a proxy war in Yemen through its militias and foreign mercenaries, allowing Abu Dhabi to manage operations from outside the picture and allow the continuation of military supplies and the removal of the UAE from the forefront.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.